Small immune effectors coordinate peptidoglycan-derived immunity to regulate intestinal bacteria in shrimp

Posted on 23.11.2022 - 19:00

Small antibacterial effectors, including lysozymes, lectins, and antimicrobial peptides, are key regulators of intestinal immunity. However, whether there is coordination among them during regulation is an interesting, but largely unknown, issue. In the present study, we revealed that small effectors synergistically regulate peptidoglycan-derived intestinal immunity in the kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus. A C-type lysozyme (LysC) was screened as a responsive factor for the intestine-bacteria interaction. LysC functions to restrict intestinal bacteria, mainly by cleaving Photobacterium damselae peptidoglycan to generate muropeptides which are powerful stimulators that induce anti-lipopolysaccharides factor B1 (AlfB1), an effective bactericidal peptide. The muropeptides also induce a C-type lectin (Ctl24), which recognizes peptidoglycan and coats bacteria. By counteracting LysC-mediated muropeptide release and AlfB1’s bactericidal activity, Ctl24 prevents the continuous elimination of intestinal bacteria. Therefore, this study demonstrates a mechanism by which small immune effectors coordinate to achieve intestinal homeostasis, and provides new insights into peptidoglycan-derived intestinal immunity in invertebrates.

CITE THIS COLLECTION

Liu, Ping-Ping; Wei, Zhe; Cheng, Zi-Hua; Wang, Xian-Wei (2022): Small immune effectors coordinate peptidoglycan-derived immunity to regulate intestinal bacteria in shrimp. PLOS Pathogens. Collection. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1010967
or
Select your citation style and then place your mouse over the citation text to select it.

SHARE

email
need help?