Accurate, high-coverage assignment of in vivo protein kinases to phosphosites from in vitro phosphoproteomic specificity data

Posted on 13.05.2022 - 17:43

Phosphoproteomic experiments routinely observe thousands of phosphorylation sites. To understand the intracellular signaling processes that generated this data, one or more causal protein kinases must be assigned to each phosphosite. However, limited knowledge of kinase specificity typically restricts assignments to a small subset of a kinome. Starting from a statistical model of a high-throughput, in vitro kinase-substrate assay, I have developed an approach to high-coverage, multi-label kinase-substrate assignment called IV-KAPhE (“In vivo-Kinase Assignment for Phosphorylation Evidence”). Tested on human data, IV-KAPhE outperforms other methods of similar scope. Such computational methods generally predict a densely connected kinase-substrate network, with most sites targeted by multiple kinases, pointing either to unaccounted-for biochemical constraints or significant cross-talk and signaling redundancy. I show that such predictions can potentially identify biased kinase-site misannotations within families of closely related kinase isozymes and they provide a robust basis for kinase activity analysis.

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Invergo, Brandon M. (2022): Accurate, high-coverage assignment of in vivo protein kinases to phosphosites from in vitro phosphoproteomic specificity data. PLOS Computational Biology. Collection. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1010110
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